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Special 2020 Tax Deduction Allows Donations of $300 to Charity Without Itemizing

Posted by Aubrey Sizer | Dec 23, 2020 | 0 Comments

As we enter the giving season, there is an additional reason to be charitable. Congress enacted a special provision that allows more people to easily deduct up to $300 in donations to qualifying charities this year.

Since the increase in the standard income tax deduction in 2018, only eleven percent (11%) of taxpayers itemize deductions, so fewer taxpayers take advantage of the charitable deduction. But to both encourage and reward giving in this difficult year, as part of the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act Congress created a one-time $300 charitable deduction for people who do not itemize on their tax returns. To qualify, you must give cash (including paying by check or credit card) to a 501(c)(3) charity. Gifts of goods or stock do not qualify.

While $300 may not seem like much, it can make a big difference to smaller charities. And several $300 gifts can add up.  One thing that's not clear is whether a married couple filing jointly can deduct $600. While it's logical that they should be able to do so, the IRS has not clarified this yet. With just a couple of weeks left in the year, time is a-wasting.

Below is a list of some websites you can visit to determine which charity you would like to support before the end of the year:

For more information from the IRS about the tax deduction, click here

About the Author

Aubrey Sizer

Aubrey Carew Sizer is a member of the Virginia State Bar with a practice focused on estate planning and elder law, specifically, long-term care planning, special needs planning for the disabled, guardianship and conservatorship, and probate, estate and trust administration.

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Attorney Sizer provides customized and affordable estate planning (including wills, living trusts, powers of attorney, and advance medical directives); elder law services (including long-term care planning, special needs planning for the disabled, and guardianships and conservatorships); probate, estate and trust administration (including advising executors and administrators of estates about post-mortem planning and the local probate process in Virginia), as well as general aging and disability advice in Northern Virginia, including but not limited to Arlington, Alexandria, Ashburn, Bristow, Burke, Centreville, Chantilly, Gainesville, Fairfax, Falls Church, Haymarket, Herndon, Leesburg, Manassas, Manassas Park, Reston, Springfield, Sterling, and throughout Loudoun, Prince William, and Fairfax counties.

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